Archive for the ‘Anvil’ Category

Blacksmith Supplies – Blacksmith Anvil Stand

Another major component to your blacksmith supplies is an anvil stand.  It is vital that you place an anvil on a stand that is the correct height.  If the anvil is not at the correct height, the faster you will become fatigued when hammering metal into shape.  The height of the anvil stand is different for every blacksmith.  Many blacksmiths use the knuckle rule which means that when the anvil is placed on the anvil stand it will reach your knuckles when you loosely ball your fists with your arms at your side.  This usually enables a blacksmith to get maximum swing and velocity  of the hammer without straining your back.  Of course the knuckle technique is no magic bullet and you should adjust the height of the anvil stand to fit your body and needs.

Blacksmiths use various materials to make an anvil stand or you could just buy a stand.  Some anvil stands are just a big piece of oak from a fallen tree or if you are in your backyard you can cut down a tree and place the anvil on the stump.  Whatever type of anvil stand you use, it must be secure and level.  If the stand is not sturdy enough it will just bounce around all over your blacksmith shop.  The anvil stand must also be able to secure the anvil from moving around when hammering.  If the anvil stand or the anvil itself moves around when you are hammering you will lose efficiency and it will take more time and energy to create the metalwork.

Below is a good video I found on how to make an anvil stand:

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Blacksmith Supplies – Choosing a Blacksmith Anvil

One of the most important of the blacksmith supplies is a blacksmith anvil.  Having a quality anvil is the foundation for creating quality ironwork and, therefore, it’s important that you choose wisely.  When choosing a blacksmith anvil you must take several things into consideration before you buy an anvil:

  1. First and foremost, NEVER buy a cast iron anvil.  These types of anvils are worthless and make it difficult to produce quality iron work.  Although more expensive, you should always buy a forged tool steel or cast tool steel anvil.  If you have a cast iron anvil, I am sure you understand what experienced blacksmiths means by “Anvil Shaped Object”.
  2. Decide whether or not to buy a new or used anvil.  New anvils can be expensive but prices have come down some;
  3. Decide on the size of the anvil you want to have. As a blacksmith, the heavier the anvil the better it is for forging.  Forging anvils can weigh 100-500 pounds.  Buy the heaviest anvil that you can afford.  A 200-300 pound anvil is usually sufficient for heavy work.  If you need an anvil that is portable for onsite light forging, go with a 100 pound anvil;
  4. If you are going to buy a used anvil, be sure the surface of the anvil is flat.  If you do not have a flat anvil then you will not be able to obtain straight ironwork;

  5. Make sure the anvil you purchase is able to accept a standard Hardie and that it has a pritchel or punching hole.

Some well known anvil manufacturers (old and new) are Refflinghaus, Kohlswa, Peddinghaus, Nimba, Vaughns, Branco, Emerson, Habermann, Euroanvil and Rathole.


Choose your blacksmith anvil wisely and you will create quality workmanship.

As mentioned above, below is an Anvil Shaped Object (Cast iron junk)!  Never buy this type of anvil.

 

anvil